Monday, 18 September 2017

ELM TREE


Once apon a time there was a beautiful Elm tree standing proud outside of my front window.
I have had the privilege of enjoying this tree for 52 years and know from old photos that it was over 100 years old.
I have watched blue tits nest in the holes of this tree for years and pigeons carefully snapping off the right size twigs for their nests .  I have watched the seeds falling like confetti and filling the gutters in the Spring and seen the faces in the bark of the trunk.
It withstood the Hurricane of 1987.


Sadly last week this tree had to be felled as it had contracted Dutch Elm Disease.
For those who are not familiar with this here is a brief synopsis.

The second epidemic of DED which arrived in the UK during the late 1960’s on infected elm logs from North America, had by 1979 killed 25 million mature elms
East Sussex has one of the country's largest populations of mature elms after controls were set up in 1973 to limit the spread of the disease
Unfortunately there is no cure and no way of saving infected trees,
The disease is transmitted by beetles which eat through infected bark and pass on the fungus. It then spreads further from tree to tree through their systems.

But the south coast populations were protected by their positioning between the English Channel and the South Downs.
Withered brown leaves are one of the first signs of Dutch elm disease 


The tree surgeons tried to save it by cutting out the infected parts but in the end it had to go.
I love trees and can't tell you how sad I am to see this tree cut down.
Apparently the council do not have enough money to replace it at the moment so we will just have to walk past the remaining stump ( this has been debarked to stop the spread ) and remember it as it used to be.
If you look closely you can see that the centre of the trunk is dark brown, in fact it had a large hole all the way up where the disease had taken hold.




22 comments:

  1. Oh that is so sad. I always hate to see trees having to be cut down

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  2. That is so sad. I hate seeing trees cut down. I bet the light is very different in the room now though.

    Julie xxxxxxxx

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  3. I love trees, my garden is surrounded by huge ones. I would be very upset if DED was to strike.

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  4. That is so sad. Understandable though. After you posted the elm seeds on Instagram, I identified a few trees in our woods as elm. Wych elma and english. None as old as yours, so I suspect they will die young. I've saved seeds and am hoping to grow some seedlings. Your tree may have gone, but it has inspired me to collect and grow more.

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  5. I love trees too. Losing one is like the death of an old friend.

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  6. I hate to see those beautiful trees cut down. I hope they treat the resulting wood, or burn it or whatever to stop the spread. Sad situation.

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  7. What a shame! I'm so sorry to hear this. I know exactly what you mean about being attached to a tree and then losing it.

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  8. That is sad news. Losing something that has been part of your life is always hard. It's a shame the council can't afford to replace it.

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  9. Oh dear, how sad. Can you decorate the stump? Maybe crochet a hat for it, tie some ribbon on it, or nail a stuffed toy to it.

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    1. Funny you should mention that. There is a lady in another street who planted flowers in the top, looked really nice.

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  10. So sad! I guess there is no way to get rid of the beetles. We had almost the same thing happen to us. We bought this house with a beautiful huge maple tree in the small front yard, and enjoyed it for about 30 years. It finally got sick and had to be cut down. We also lost all the shade in the house, but we do have a better view. I miss the tree so much, and I know the birds do, too. Will you buy something to plant there? We keep telling ourselves that we will, but we never seen to get around to it. Lovely but sad pictures.

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    1. The council will get around to replanting one day Ginny but who knows how long.

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  11. That is so sad, it's always a shame for a tree to be cut down, especially such an old one xx

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  12. I always find it really sad when an old tree has to be cut down.We have one in our small front garden and over the past 40 years we have lived here i have watched it grow to higher than our house,watched birds making nest in it and eating the red berrys that are on it all year round.Its always a welcome sight when i return home.I would hate it if it had to come down,But i think that decorating the stump in some way would be great!Debi,x

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  13. such a shame the tree had to go, had no idea DED was still around. Likewise did not know that the middle of the tree dies, I suspect it would have come down in high winds if left much longer hope they plant a replacement tree soon. mexpect the cats loved watching the bird life too

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  14. I do so love trees and wish you could have a needles for knitting or tatting shuttles made from this to remainds you of this tree and how it still provides.

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    1. Sadly, they have to destroy every little bit to stop the spread of the disease, but yes it would be lovely wouldn't it?

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  15. Poor Elm Tree ! I guess it had to go before it fell down. Could you plant an Acorn where it was ? I have a favourite Oak Tree where I walk my Dog I love to hug. I must look for Elm Trees and find out more about them

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  16. This is very sad. I've had favorite trees cut down too. I think it's the knowing that it will take another 100 years to become something so grand and I'm a little sad that I won't be here to see it. - Lots of people feel a sadness when trees have to come down. I wonder why we have such a connection to them...

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  17. That's so sad. Could you perhaps plant a new tree there yourself?

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